Head teacher………Rena Begum              PROPRIETOR     Neyarun Nessa

 

1 Named personnel with designated responsibility and 4 deputy designated for Safeguarding

 

Academic year Designated Senior person Deputy Designated Senior person
2016-2017 (Rena Begum) Afia Rahman Assistant Headteacher
Amin Rahman ICT CORDINATOR
Appointed 2015 Mujibur Rahman PE teacher
Appointed

October 2016

Shaheda Khanom Deputy Head teacher

 

Policy review dates

 

Review Date Changes made By whom Date Shared
09//2017  X3 points HT 02/09/22016

 

Dates of Staff training and details of course title and training provider

Policies and procedures

 

Whole school Designated Senior person Deputy Designated Senior Person
02/ 09 /2016

Prevent training

 

Afia Rahman

Tim Llewleyn

Rena Begum

2.

CONTENTS

Introduction

School Commitment

Providing a Safe and Supportive Environment

  1. Safer Recruitment and Selection
  2. Safe Practice
  3. Safeguarding Information for Pupils
  4. Partnership with Parents
  5. Partnership with Others
  6. School Training and Staff Induction
  7. Support, Advice and Guidance for Staff
  8. Related School Policies (inc. Children Missing from Education)
  9. Pupil Information
  10. Roles and Responsibilities:

Governing Body

            Headteacher

            Designated Senior Person

            All Staff and Volunteers

Identifying Children who are suffering or likely to suffer Significant Harm

Definitions

Taking Action to Ensure that Children are Safe at School and at Home

  1. Staff will immediately report
  2. Responding to Disclosure
  3. Action by Designated Senior Person
  4. Action following a Child Protection referral
  5. Recording and Monitoring
  6. Supporting the Child and Partnership with Parents

Allegations regarding person(s) working in or on behalf of school

 

INTRODUCTION

 Definitions:

Keeping Children Safe in Education, 2016, states:

‘Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is defined for the purposes of this guidance as:

  • protecting children from maltreatment;
  • preventing impairment of children’s health or development;
  • ensuring that children grow up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care; and
  • taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes.

 Children include everyone under the age of 18.

Where a child is suffering significant harm, or is likely to do so, action should be taken to protect that child. Action should also be taken to promote the welfare of a child in need of additional support, even if they are not suffering harm or are at immediate risk.

Effective safeguarding arrangements in every local area should be underpinned by two key principles:

  • safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility: for services to be effective each professional and organisation should play their full part; and
  • a child-centred approach: for services to be effective they should be based on a clear understanding of the needs and views of children.

Working Together to Safeguard Children states that everyone who comes into contact with children has a role to play and provides statutory guidance.

Children have said that they need:

  •    Vigilance: to have adults notice when things are troubling them
  • Understanding and action: to understand what is happening; to be heard and understood; and to have that understanding acted upon
  •   Stability: to be able to develop an on-going stable relationship of trust with those helping them
  •    Respect: to be treated with the expectation that they are competent rather than not
  •    Information and engagement: to be informed about and involved in procedures, decisions, concerns and plans
  • Explanation: to be informed of the outcome of assessments and decisions and reasons when their views have not met with a positive response
  • Support: to be provided with support in their own right as well as a member of their family
  •   Advocacy: to be provided with advocacy to assist them in putting forward their views

Buttercup Primary School fully recognises its responsibilities for child protection and has a clear expectation that all staff conform to this policy with the highest level of regard.

Our policy applies to all staff, Proprietor and volunteers working in the school and aims to give clear direction about expected codes of behaviour in dealing with child protection issues. The policy also aims to make explicit the school’s commitment to the development of good practice and sound procedures. There are five main elements to our policy:

  • Ensuring we practise safe recruitment in checking the suitability of staff and volunteers to work with children.
  • Raising awareness of child protection issues and equipping staff and children with the skills needed to keep children safe.
  • Developing and then implementing procedures for identifying and reporting cases, or suspected cases, of abuse.
  • Supporting pupils who have been abused in accordance with his/her agreed child protection plan.
  • Establishing a safe environment in which children can learn and develop

Child protection is the responsibility of all school staff.

All staff members are committed to children’s and young people’s welfare and safety and are clear about their responsibilities to safeguard and promote children’s welfare. Our school is a community and all those directly connected (staff, Proprietors, parents, families and pupils) have an essential role to play in making it safe and secure. We welcome suggestions and comments contributing to this process. All staff members believe that our school should provide a caring, positive safe and stimulating environment that promotes the social, physical and moral development of the individual child.

Buttercup Primary School will therefore:

  • Establish and maintain an environment where children feel secure, are encouraged to talk, and are listened to.
  • Ensure all steps are taken to maintain site security and pupils’ physical safety
  • Ensure children know that there are adults in the school whom they can approach if they are worried.
  • Include opportunities in the curriculum for children to develop the skills they need to recognise and stay safe from abuse.
  • Have procedures about how to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.
  • Have procedures for dealing with allegations of abuse against members of staff and volunteers.
  • Make sure staff access appropriate training that helps them do their job well.
  • Work with parents to build an understanding of the school’s responsibility to ensure the welfare of all children including the need for referral to other agencies in some situations
  •    Work openly and effectively with all other relevant organisations.
  • Develop a structured procedure within the school which will be followed by all members of the school community in cases of suspected abuse.
  • Monitor children and young people who have been identified as having welfare or protection concerns; keeping confidential records which are stored securely and shared appropriately with other professionals.

 

  1. Overall Aims

To contribute to the prevention of abusive experiences in the following ways:

  • Clarifying standards of behaviour for staff and pupils
  • Introducing appropriate work in the curriculum
  • Developing staff awareness of the causes and signs of abuse
  • Encouraging pupil and parental participation in practice
  • Addressing concerns at the earliest possible stage

To contribute to the protection of our pupils in the following ways:

  • Including appropriate work in the curriculum
  • Implementing child protection policies and procedures
  • Working in partnership with pupils, parents and agencies

To contribute to supporting our pupils in the following ways:

  • Identifying individual needs where possible
  • Designing support plans and interventions to meet individual needs

  In-school procedures for protecting children

All staff and volunteers will:

  • Read and be familiar with Part One of Keeping Children Safe in Education (DfE September 2016), this policy and other relevant, linked policies.
  • Be familiar with the school’s Child Protection Policy including issues of confidentiality.
  • Remember that the child’s welfare and interests must be the paramount consideration at all times.
  • Never promise to keep a secret or confidentiality, where a child discloses abuse.
  • Be alert to signs and indicators of possible abuse (see Appendix 1 for current definitions of abuse and examples of harm).
  • Record concerns Staff have blank copies of the, “Cause for Concern” forms, which, can be used to write notes if a child makes an immediate disclosure, once completed, must be handed to the designated safeguarding lead (Rena Begum) or her deputy (Afia Rahman) who will scan in the handwritten notes
  • Deal with a disclosure of abuse from a child in line with the recommendations in Appendix 2. These must be passed to one of the designated staff immediately Staff should not take it upon themselves to investigate concerns or make judgements.
  • Be involved in on-going monitoring and recording to support the implementation of interagency child protection and child support plans.
  • Be subject to Safer Recruitment processes (staff) and Disclosure and Barring Service checks (all adults working in school).
  • Will be expected to behave in accordance with the ‘Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings’ October 2015

 It is in line with the Tower Hamlets Safeguarding Children Board Child Protection Procedures, lscb@towerhamlets.gov.uk

Keeping children safe in Education (September 2016 ) and ‘What to do if you are worried a child is being abused’ (2006)

 

This policy applies to all adults, including volunteers, working in or on behalf of the school.

‘Everyone working in or for our school service shares an objective to help keep children and young people safe by contributing to:

  • providing a safe environment for children and young people to learn and develop in our school setting, and
  • identifying children and young people who are suffering or likely to suffer significant harm, and taking appropriate action with the aim of making sure they are kept safe both at home and in our school setting’

 SCHOOL COMMITMENT

 Buttercup Primary is committed to Safeguarding and Promoting the Welfare of all of its pupils. Each pupil’s welfare is of paramount importance. We recognise that some children may be especially vulnerable to abuse.  We recognise that children who are abused or neglected may find it difficult to develop a sense of self worth and to view the world in a positive way. Whilst at school, their behaviour may be challenging. We recognise that some children who have experienced abuse may harm others. We will always take a considered and sensitive approach in order that we can support all of our pupils.

 

 PROVIDING A SAFE AND SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENT

 Safer Recruitment and Selection

The school pays full regard to current DFE guidance ‘Keeping Children safe in Education 2016 and Safer Recruitment in Education’ Jan 2007. We ensure that all appropriate measures are applied in relation to everyone who works in the school who is likely to be perceived by the children as a safe and trustworthy adult including e.g. volunteers and staff employed by contractors. Safer recruitment practice includes scrutinising applicants, verifying identity and academic or vocational qualifications, obtaining professional references, checking previous employment history and ensuring that a candidate has the health and physical capacity for the job. It also includes undertaking interviews and, where appropriate, undertaking List 99 and Criminal Records Bureau checks.

In line with statutory changes, underpinned by regulations, the following will apply:

 

  • a CRB Enhanced Disclosure is obtained for all new appointments to our school’s workforce through staffing personnel and payroll, from October 2009 there will be a requirement for employees to be registered with the Independent Safeguarding Authority
  • this school is committed to keep an up to date single central record detailing a range of checks carried out on our staff
  • all new appointments to our school workforce who have lived outside the UK will be subject to additional checks as appropriate
  • our school ensures that supply staff have undergone the necessary checks and will be made aware of this policy
  • Identity checks must be carried out on all appointments to our school workforce before the appointment is made.

…. (Rena Begum)………………… (Headteacher)

…Afia Rahman…………………… (Assistant Headteacher)

 

have undertaken the National College for School Leadership Safe Recruitment training (www.ncsl.org.uk). One of the above will be involved in all staff and volunteer appointments and arrangements (including, where appropriate, contracted services).

 

Safe Practice

Our school will comply with the current Safe Practice guidance to be found in lbth Safeguarding Procedures at lscb@towerhamlets.gov.uk

Safe working practice ensures that pupils are safe and that all staff:

  • are responsible for their own actions and behaviour and should avoid any conduct which would lead any reasonable person to question their motivation and intentions;
  • work in an open and transparent way;
  • work with other colleagues where possible in situations open to question
  • discuss and/or take advice from school management over any incident which may give rise to concern;
  • record any incidents or decisions made;
  • apply the same professional standards regardless of gender or sexuality;
  • be aware of confidentiality policy
  • are aware that breaches of the law and other professional guidelines could result in criminal or disciplinary action being taken against them.
  1. Safeguarding Information for pupils

All pupils in our school are aware of a number of staff who they can talk to.  The school is committed to ensuring that pupils are aware of behaviour towards them that is not acceptable and how they can keep themselves safe. All pupils know that we have a senior member of staff with responsibility for child protection and know who this is. We inform pupils of whom they might talk to, both in and out of school, their right to be listened to and heard and what steps can be taken to protect them from harm. P.S.H.E. materials we use to help pupils learn how to keep safe are (see Appendix 3):

Our school will ensure that pupils are made aware that information can be found at the following ‘ website addresses, & helplines, posters, NSPCC and Childline ‘kidzone Miss dorothy.com, Crucial Crew, Living Dangerously etc… ( see appendix 1)

School’s arrangements for consulting with and listening to pupils are via school council, peer support schemes

We make pupils aware of these arrangements by assemblies and newsletters

Mobile Phones and Digital Photography

Children have their photographs taken to provide evidence of their achievements for developmental records (The Early Years Foundation Stage, EYFS 2007). Staff, visitors, volunteers and students are not permitted to use their own mobile phones to take or record any images of the school children for their own records during session times.

Procedures

  • Under the Data Protection Act 1998, the school must seek parental consent to take
  • photographs and use video recorders. Photographs will be stored on the school office computer, which is password protected, until the school ceases to operate, should this occur then all photographs will be shredded or deleted from the school computer.
  • The schools digital camera/s or memory cards must not leave the Building. Photos are printed in the school by staff and images are then removed from the cameras memory.
  • Photographs may be taken during indoor and outdoor play and displayed in albums or a child’s development records for children and parent/carers to look through.( for Early Years and both Primary.
  • Often photographs may contain other children in the background.
  • Events such as, Sports day, Outings, Awards assembly and Events may be recorded by video and photographs by staff and parent/carers but always in full view of all attending.
  • On occasion we might like to use photographs of the children taking part in an activity to advertise/promote our school via our Web site etc; however in this instance specific parental permission for these events would be required.
  • Many mobile phones have inbuilt cameras so staff mobile phones should be turned off, must be not carried around in staff pockets and should be left with personal belongings on the stage area. Visitors may only use their phones in the foyer or outside the building.
  • Cameras and mobile phones are prohibited in the toilets.
  • In cases of a personal emergency all personal calls should be directed through the School mobile phone.( 07429112217)
  • Staff are asked not to make personal calls during their working hours. However, in urgent cases, a call may be made or accepted if deemed necessary and by arrangement with the Head Teacher
  • Schools mobile phone is kept on the admin table and has no camera facility.
  1. Partnership with Parents
  • The school shares a purpose with parents to educate and keep children safe from harm and to have their welfare promoted. Further information can be found; lscb@towerhamlets.gov.uk, nspcc.org.uk; www.ceop.gov.uk ) or Tower Hamlets Duty and Assessment Team on 0207364 5000
  • We are committed to working with parents positively, openly and honestly. We ensure that all parents are treated with respect, dignity and courtesy. We respect parents’ rights to privacy and confidentiality and will not share sensitive information unless we have permission or it is necessary to do so in order to protect a child.
  • Buttercup Primary will share with parents any concerns we may have about their child unless to do so may place a child at risk of harm (see 3 Action by Senior Designated Person)
  • We encourage parents to discuss any concerns they may have and make parents aware of our policy via school Prospectus, School website, open days &newsletter. Parents are made aware that they can view this policy on request.
  • Buttercup Primary is committed to ensuring the welfare and safety of all children in school. Will follow the Tower Hamlets Safeguarding Children Board procedures. The school will, in most circumstances, endeavour to discuss all concerns with parents about their children. However, there may be exceptional circumstances when the school will discuss concerns with Social Care and/or the Police without parental knowledge (in accordance with Child Protection procedures). The school will, of course, always aim to maintain a positive relationship with all parents. The school’s child protection policy is available on request

 

Partnerships with others

Our school recognises that it is essential to establish positive and effective working relationships with other agencies who are partners in the Tower Hamlets Safeguarding Children Board. E.g. LA, Social Care, Barnardo’s, Police, Health, Council, Childline in Partnership with schools, NSPCC, National Youth Advocacy Service, Surestart , Children’s Fund etc.) There is a joint responsibility on all these agencies to share information to ensure the safeguarding of all children.

  1. School Training and Staff Induction
  • The school’s senior member of staff with designated responsibility for child protection undertakes basic child protection training and training in inter–agency working, (that is provided by the Tower Hamlets Safeguarding Children Board) and refresher training at 2 yearly intervals (inter-agency courses can be booked on line at lscb@towerhamlets.gov.uk
  • The Headteacher and all other school staff, including non teaching staff, undertake appropriate induction training to equip them to carry out their responsibilities for child protection effectively, which is kept up to date by refresher training at 3 yearly intervals.
  • Basic Awareness online training lscb@towerhamlets.gov.uk Whole school Basic Awareness Training can be booked via the Tower hamlets Safeguarding Children Board on 0207 364 7947
  • All staff (including temporary staff and volunteers) are provided with the school’s child protection policy and informed of school’s child protection arrangements on induction.
  1. Support, Advice and Guidance for Staff

 Staff will be supported by the school, LA and professional associations.

The designated senior person for Safeguarding/Child Protection will be supported by LSCB IN Tower Hamlets.

Advice is available from Tower Hamlets Duty & Assessment Team CP Unit and the Police Child Abuse Investigation Team see Contacts list Appendix 1)

 

  1. Related School Policies

‘…..safeguarding covers more than the contribution made to child protection in relation to individual children.  It also encompasses issues such as pupil health and safety and bullying……and a range of other issues, for example, arrangements for meeting the medical needs of children ….providing first aid, school security, drugs and substance misuse, positive behaviour etc.  There may also be other safeguarding issues that are specific to the local area or population’

Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education DfES 2007

 Children Missing from Education8

The school follows the Tower Hamlets LA procedures “Children Who May Be Missing/Lost From Education ”. Contact Brendan Muchacy  on Missing Education Team on: __0207 364 3462_ Where children on roll at a school do not turn up, and this school has made the usual enquiries they should refer the case to the education Social Work Service in the usual way.  If the allocated worker can not locate the child/family they will inform the Children Missing Education team and the school will be advised by them or the ESW Service that they can take the child of roll (normally after 4 weeks).

Confidentiality

School has regard to “Information Sharing: Practitioner’s guide” HM Government, 2006 www.ecm.gov.uk/deliveringservices/informationsharing

“Where there is a concern that the child may be suffering or is at risk of suffering significant harm, the child’s safety and welfare must be the overriding consideration. “

The School should has a clear and explicit confidentiality policy.

 The school policy indicates:

  1. When information must be shared with police and Social Care where the child/young person is / may be at risk of significant harm
  2. When the pupil’s and/or parent’s confidentiality must not be breached
  3. That information is shared on a need to know basis

 Pupil Information

 Our school will endeavour to keep up to date and accurate information in order to keep children safe and provide appropriate care for them the school requires accurate and up to date information regarding:

  • names and contact details of persons with whom the child normally lives
  • names and contact details of all persons with parental responsibility (if different from above)
  • emergency contact details (if different from above)
  • details of any persons authorised to collect the child from school (if different from above)
  • any relevant court orders in place including those which affect any person’s access to the child (e.g. Residence Order, Contact Order, Care Order, Injunctions etc.)
  • if the child is or has been on the Child Protection Register or subject to a care plan
  • name and contact detail of G.P.
  • any other factors which may impact on the safety and welfare of the child

The school will collate, store and agree access to this information

 Roles and Responsibilities

 

The Proprietor will ensure that..

 the school has a child protection policy and procedures in place that are in accordance with local authority guidance and locally agreed inter-agency procedures, and the policy is made available to parents on request;

  • the school operates safe recruitment procedures and makes sure that all appropriate checks are carried out on staff and volunteers who work with children;
  • the school has procedures for dealing with allegations of abuse against staff and volunteers that comply with guidance from the local authority and locally agreed inter-agency procedures;
  • a senior member of the school’s leadership team is designated to take lead responsibility for child protection (and deputy);
  • staff undertake appropriate child protection training;
  • they remedy, without delay, any deficiencies or weaknesses regarding child protection arrangements;
  • the Deputy Head is nominated to be responsible for liaising with the LA and /or partner agencies in the event of allegations of abuse being made against the head teacher
  • deal with any allegations of whistle blowing in relation to the Headteacher
  • where services or activities are provided on the school premises by another body, the body concerned has appropriate policies and procedures in place in regard to safeguarding children and child protection and liaises with the school on these matters where appropriate.
  • they review their policies and procedures annually and provide information to the LA about them and about how the above duties have been discharged

 

Our Head teacher will ensure that:

 the policies and procedures adopted by the Proprietor are fully implemented, and followed by all staff;

  • sufficient resources and time are allocated to enable the designated person and other staff to discharge their responsibilities; and
  • all staff and volunteers feel able to raise concerns about poor or unsafe practice in regard to children, and such concerns are addressed sensitively and effectively in a timely manner in accordance with agreed whistle blowing policies.

 Senior Member of Staff with Designated Responsibility for Child Protection will:

 

Referrals

  •  refer cases of suspected abuse or allegations to the relevant investigating agencies;
  • act as a source of support , advice and expertise within the educational establishment;
  • liaise with the headteacher to inform him/her of any issues and ongoing investigations and ensure there is always cover for this role.

  

Training

 

  • recognise how to identify signs of abuse and when it is appropriate to make a referral;
  • have a working knowledge of how Tower Hamlets Safeguarding Children Board operate, the conduct of a child protection case conference and be able to attend and contribute to these;
  • ensure that all staff have access to and understand the school’s child protection policy;
  • ensure that all staff have induction training;
  • keep detailed accurate secure written records and/or concerns
  • obtain access to resources and attend any relevant or refresher training courses at least every two years.

Raising Awareness

  • ensure the child protection policy is updated and reviewed annually and work with the Proprietor regarding this;
  • ensure parents are made aware of the child protection policy which alerts them to the fact that referrals may be made and the role of the establishment in this to avoid conflict later;
  • Where a child leaves the establishment, ensure the child protection file is copied for the new establishment ASAP and transferred to the new school separately from the main pupil file. If a child goes missing or leaves to be educated at home, then the child protection file should be copied and the copy forwarded to the Education Social Work Service.
  • Where the parents inform school that they wish to ‘parentally educate’ their child, the ESW Service endeavours to undertake a home visit to discuss this with the parents and the information is then passed to EARS service who monitors ‘ Parentally Educated Children’ (PECS).

 

The designated safeguarding lead should ensure the school’s policies are known and used appropriately:   

  • Ensure the school’s child protection policy is reviewed annually and the procedures and implementation are updated and reviewed regularly, working with the Proprietor regarding this.
  • Ensure the child protection policy is on the school’s website, available publicly and parents are aware of the fact that referrals about suspected abuse or neglect may be made and the role of the school in this.
  • Link with the local authority to make sure staff are aware of training opportunities and the latest local policies on safeguarding.

 Overall Aims

To contribute to the prevention of abusive experiences in the following ways:

  • Clarifying standards of behaviour for staff and pupils
  • Introducing appropriate work in the curriculum
  • Developing staff awareness of the causes and signs of abuse
  • Encouraging pupil and parental participation in practice
  • Addressing concerns at the earliest possible stage

To contribute to the protection of our pupils in the following ways:

  • Including appropriate work in the curriculum
  • Implementing child protection policies and procedures
  • Working in partnership with pupils, parents and agencies

To contribute to supporting our pupils in the following ways:  

  • Identifying individual needs where possible
  • Designing support plans and interventions to meet individual needs

  

All staff and volunteers will:

  •  fully comply with the school’s policies and procedures
  • attend appropriate training
  • inform the designated person of any concerns

 

Prevention in the Curriculum

The school recognises the importance of developing students’ awareness of behaviour that is unacceptable towards them and others, and how they can help keep themselves and others safe.

 

  • The PSHE programme in each key stage provides personal development opportunities for students to learn about keeping safe and who to ask for help if their safety is threatened.  Students are provided opportunities to explore how to be healthy and lead a safer lifestyle.

 

Forced Marriages (FM)

 

  • This is an entirely separate issue from arranged marriage. It is a human rights abuse and falls within the Crown Prosecution Service definition of domestic violence. Young men and women can be at risk in affected ethnic groups. Whistle-blowing may come from younger siblings.
  • Other indicators may be detected by changes in adolescent behaviours. William Brookes Academy Trust will never attempt to intervene directly or through a third party, but will liaise with the relevant agencies.

 

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)

It is essential that staff are aware of FGM practices and the need to look for signs, symptoms and other indicators of FGM.  FGM involves procedures that intentionally alter/injure the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. FGM is internationally recognised as a violation of human rights of girls and women.  It is illegal in most countries including the UK.

Circumstances and occurrences that may point to FGM happening

 

  • Child talking about getting ready for a special ceremony
  • Family taking a long trip abroad
  • Child’s family being from one of the ‘at risk’ communities for FGM (Kenya, Somalia, Sudan,  Sierra Leon, Egypt, Nigeria, Eritrea as well as non-African communities including Yemeni, Afghani, Kurdistan, Indonesia and Pakistan)
  • Knowledge that the child’s sibling has undergone FGM
  • Child talks about going abroad to be ‘cut’ or to prepare for marriage

 

Signs that may indicate a child has undergone FGM:

  • Prolonged absence from school and other activities
  • Behaviour change on return from a holiday abroad, such as being withdrawn and appearing subdued
  • Bladder or menstrual problems
  • Finding it difficult to sit still and looking uncomfortable
  • Complaining about pain between the legs
  • Mentioning something somebody did to them that they are not allowed to talk about
  • Secretive behaviour, including isolating themselves from the group
  • Reluctance to take part in physical activity
  • Repeated urinal tract infection
  • Disclosure

 

All school staff should be aware that abuse, neglect and safeguarding issues are rarely standalone events that can be covered by one definition or label. In most cases multiple issues will overlap with one another.

 

Abuse: a form of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by inflicting harm or by failing to act to prevent harm. Children may be abused in a family or in an institutional or community setting by those known to them or, more rarely, by others (e.g. via the internet). They may be abused by an adult or adults or another child or children.

Physical abuse: a form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

Examples which may indicate physical abuse (it is not designed to be used as a checklist):

patterns of bruising; inconsistent account of how bruising or injuries occurred

  • Finger, hand or nail marks, black eyes
  • Bite marks
  • Round burn marks, burns and scalds
  • Lacerations, wealds
  • Fractures
  • Bald patches
  • Symptoms of drug or alcohol intoxication or poisoning
  • Unaccountable covering of limbs, even in hot weather
  • Fear of going home or parents being contacted
  • Fear of medical help
  • Fear of changing for PE
  • Inexplicable fear of adults or over-compliance
  • Violence or aggression towards others including bullying
  • Isolation from peers

 

Emotional abuse: the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing

them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children. These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction. It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, although it may occur alone.

  • Examples which may indicate emotional abuse (it is not designed to be used as a checklist):
  • Over-reaction to mistakes, continual self-deprecation
  • Delayed physical, mental, emotional development
  • Sudden speech or sensory disorders
  • Inappropriate emotional responses, fantasies
  • Neurotic behaviour: rocking, banging head, regression, tics and twitches
  • Self-harming
  • Fear of parents being contacted
  • Running away / Going missing
  • Compulsive stealing
  • Appetite disorders – anorexia nervosa, bulimia
  • Soiling, smearing faeces, enuresis

 

Sexual abuse: involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing. They may also include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males. Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

 

Examples which may indicate sexual abuse (it is not designed to be used as a checklist):

Sexually explicit play or behaviour or age-inappropriate knowledge

Anal or vaginal discharge, soreness or scratching

    • Inability to concentrate, tiredness Refusal to communicate.
    • Thrush, Persistent complaints of stomach disorders or pains
    • Eating disorders, for example anorexia nervosa and bulimia
    • Attention seeking behaviour, self-mutilation
    • Aggressive behaviour including sexual harassment or molestation
    • Unusually compliant
    • Regressive behaviour, Enuresis, soiling
    • Frequent or open masturbation, touching others inappropriately
    • Depression, withdrawal, isolation from peer group
    • Reluctance to undress for PE or swimming
    • Bruises, scratches in genital area
    • Reluctance to go home

Neglect: the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to: provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment. It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

 

Examples which may indicate neglect (it is not designed to be used as a checklist):

  • Hunger
  • Tiredness or listlessness
  • Child dirty or unkempt
  • Poorly or inappropriately clad for the weather
  • Poor school attendance or often late for school
  • Poor concentration
  • Affection or attention seeking behaviour
  • Untreated illnesses/injuries
  • Pallid complexion
  • Stealing or scavenging compulsively
  • Failure to achieve developmental milestones, for example growth, weight
  • Failure to develop intellectually or socially
  • Neurotic behaviour

 

Responses from parents: Research and experience indicates that the following responses from parents may suggest a cause for concern across all four categories:

  • An unexpected delay in seeking treatment that is obviously needed
  • An unawareness or denial of any injury, pain or loss of function (for example, a fractured limb)
  • Incompatible explanations offered, several different explanations or the child is said to have acted in a way that is inappropriate to her/his age and development
  • Reluctance to give information or failure to mention other known relevant injuries
  • Frequent presentation of minor injuries
  • Unrealistic expectations or constant complaints about the child
  • Alcohol misuse or other drug/substance misuse
  • Parents request removal of the child from home
  • Violence between adults in the household

Disabled Children: When working with children with disabilities, practitioners need to be aware that additional possible indicators of abuse and/or neglect may also include:

  • A bruise in a site that might not be of concern on an ambulant child such  as the shin, might be of concern on a non-mobile child
  • Not getting enough help with feeding leading to malnourishment
  • Poor toileting arrangements
  • Lack of stimulation
  • Unjustified and/or excessive use of restraint
  • Rough handling, extreme behaviour modification e.g. deprivation of liquid medication, food or clothing, disabling wheelchair batteries
  • Unwillingness to try to learn a child’s means of communication
  • Ill-fitting equipment e.g. callipers, sleep boards, inappropriate splinting;

Peer on peer abuse:

Peer on peer abuse is when a child might have been abused by another child. There is no clear boundary between incidents that should be regarded as abusive and incidents that are more properly dealt with as bullying, sexual experimentation etc. This is a matter of professional judgement.

If one child or young person causes harm to another, this should not necessarily be dealt with as abuse: bullying, fighting and harassment between children are not generally seen as child protection issues. However, any concern must be referred to the DSL/ASL particularly if:

  • There is a large difference in power (for example age, size, ability, development) between the young people concerned; or
  • The perpetrator has repeatedly tried to harm one or more other children; or
  • There are concerns about the intention of the alleged perpetrator. If the evidence suggests that there was an intention to cause severe harm to the victim, this should be regarded as abusive whether or not severe harm was actually caused.

Forced Marriage (FM)

This is an entirely separate issue from arranged marriage. It is a human rights abuse and falls within the Crown Prosecution Service definition of domestic violence. Young men and women can be at risk in affected ethnic groups. Whistle-blowing may come from younger siblings. Other indicators may be detected by changes in adolescent behaviours. Never attempt to intervene directly as a school or through a third party.

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) 

It is essential that staff are aware of FGM practices and the need to look for signs, symptoms and other indicators of FGM.

What is FGM?

It involves procedures that intentionally alter/injure the female genital organs for non-medical
reasons.

Why is it carried out?

Belief that (note these statements maybe myths)

  • FGM brings status/respect to the girl – social acceptance for marriage
  • Preserves a girl’s virginity
  • Part of being a woman / rite of passage
  • Upholds family honour
  • Cleanses and purifies the girl
  • Gives a sense of belonging to the community
  • Fulfils a religious requirement
  • Perpetuates a custom/tradition
  • Helps girls be clean / hygienic
  • Is cosmetically desirable
  • Mistakenly believed to make childbirth easier

 

Is FGM legal?

FGM is internationally recognised as a violation of human rights of girls and women.  It is illegal in
most countries including the UK.

Circumstances and occurrences that may point to FGM happening

  • Child talking about getting ready for a special ceremony
  • Family taking a long trip abroad
  • Child’s family being from one of the ‘at risk’ communities for FGM (Kenya, Somalia, Sudan, Sierra Leon, Egypt, Nigeria, Eritrea as well as non-African communities including Yemeni, Afghani, Kurdistan, Indonesia and Pakistan)
  • Knowledge that the child’s sibling has undergone FGM
  • Child talks about going abroad to be ‘cut’ or to prepare for marriage

 

Signs that may indicate a child has undergone FGM:

  • Prolonged absence from school and other activities
  • Behaviour change on return from a holiday abroad, such as being withdrawn and appearing subdued
  • Bladder or menstrual problems
  • Finding it difficult to sit still and looking uncomfortable
  • Complaining about pain between the legs
  • Mentioning something somebody did to them that they are not allowed to talk about
  • Secretive behaviour, including isolating themselves from the group
  • Reluctance to take part in physical activity
  • Repeated urinal tract infection
  • Disclosure

 

The ‘One Chance’ rule

As with Forced Marriage there is the ‘One Chance’ rule. It is essential that settings /schools/colleges take action without delay. Teachers must personally report to the police a disclosure that FGM has been carried out (in addition to liaising with the DSL).

Recognising possible abuse 

There are four key steps to follow to help you to identify and respond appropriately to possible abuse and/or neglect. It may not always be appropriate to go through all four stages sequentially. If a child is in immediate danger or is at risk of harm, you should refer to children’s social care and/or the police. Before doing so, you should try to establish the basic facts. However, it will be the role of social workers and the police to investigate cases and make a judgement on whether there should be a statutory intervention and/or a criminal investigation.

You should record, in writing, all concerns and discussions about a child’s welfare, the decisions
made and the reasons for those decisions.

The correct identification of abuse is a highly complex task and is the remit of other professional agencies. Our task is to report any suspicions that we might have. Many of the children we come into contact with may exhibit one or more of the indicators outlined above at some stage in their school career and it is extremely important that whilst being vigilant we assume nothing and do not jump to conclusions. If you have any concerns or are in any doubt then you must inform the Designated Safeguarding Lead immediately.

  • Be alert to any injury which a child cannot explain. If a child has an injury, ask yourself whether it appears appropriate in relation to the child’s age and sporting activities.
  • Be wary of bruising or other injuries inflicted on areas of the body not usually seen.
  • An abuser may threaten a child and/or tell a child that they must keep what has happened secret. For this reason a child may hide injuries and avoid activities that might involve revealing them.
  • In the case of sexual abuse, inappropriate language or a preoccupation with sexual matters may arouse your suspicion. A child may know more than is natural for their age.
  • Parents’ and carers’ attitudes towards a child may indicate emotional abuse – persistent insults, putting a child down, absence of affection. Also excessive or inappropriate discipline or rejection may be noticed. A parent or carer may seem excessively defensive, uninterested or hostile.
  • Neglect may become apparent through the child being insufficiently dressed for the time of year, repeatedly not being collected from activities, constantly seeming hungry or unwell or having untreated medical conditions.
  • The following might indicate abuse: anti-social behaviour, low self-esteem, an over-eager desire to please, self-deprecation, over-activity, clumsiness, unusual bruising or bleeding, selfmutilation, recurring nightmares, possession of unexplained sums of money, depression and passive or lethargic behaviour.

 

The effects of child abuse  

The effects of cruelty to children can be wide ranging and profound, spilling over into adulthood. The general effects include:

  •  behavioural problems;
  • educational problems;
  • mental health problems;
  • relationship difficulties;
  • drug and alcohol problems;
  • suicide or other self-harm;
  • death following abuse.

Appendix 3 Dealing with a disclosure of abuse·     Invasive procedures

  

When a child tells me about abuse s/he has suffered, what must I remember?

  • Stay calm
  • Do not transmit shock, anger or embarrassment.
  • Reassure the child. Tell her/him you are pleased that s/he is speaking to you.
  • Never enter into a pact of secrecy with the child. Assure her/him that you will try to help but let the child know that you will have to tell other people in order to do this. State who this will be and why.
  • Tell her/him that you believe them. Children very rarely lie about abuse; but s/he may have tried to tell others and not been heard or believed.
  • Tell the child that it is not her/his fault.
  • Encourage the child to talk but do not ask “leading questions” or press for information.
  • Listen and remember.
  • Check that you have understood correctly what the child is trying to tell you.
  • Praise the child for telling you. Communicate that s/he has a right to be safe and protected.
  • Do not tell the child that what s/he experienced is dirty, naughty or bad.
  • It is inappropriate to make any comments about the alleged offender.
  • Be aware that the child may retract what s/he has told you. It is essential to record all you have heard.
  • At the end of the conversation, tell the child again who you are going to tell and why that person or those people need to know.
  • As soon as you can afterwards, make a detailed record of the conversation using the child’s own language (if this is on paper it will then be scanned into CPOMS). Include any questions you may have asked.   Do not add any opinions or interpretations.

 

NB It is not education staff’s role to seek disclosures. Their role is to observe that something may be wrong, ask about it, listen, be available and try to make time to talk.

 Immediately afterwards

Clear indications or disclosure of abuse must be reported to Children’s Social Work Service without delay, by the Head teacher / Designated Safeguarding Lead/staff using the correct procedures as stated in the guidelines.

 

Strictly Confidential

 Guidance Notes:  What was our involvement with this child and family?

Construct a comprehensive chronology of involvement by the agency and/or professional(s) in contact with the child and family over the period of time set out in the review’s terms of reference.  Briefly summarise decisions reached, the services offered and/or provided to the child (ren) and family, and other action taken.

  Buttercup Primary School –  action to ‘minimise risk’ includes:

  • Ensuring that the school operates safer recruitment practice from the creation of an advert through to appointment, the aim being to deter and prevent unsuitable people gaining access to children.
  • Ensuring all staff undergo the appropriate level of check before starting work.
  • Keeping a single central record of staff and the checks that have been carried out.
  • Ensuring school creates a safe ethos for children to learn within. This includes having a clear Code of Conduct for staff to ensure safe working practice.
  • Ensuring that all necessary risk assessments are carried out for school activities.
  • Ensuring health and safety issues are recognised and dealt with efficiently and without delay.
  • Ensuring that staff are given appropriate levels of training and that training is refreshed regularly.
  • Ensuring that child protection issues are included within the school curriculum.
  • Ensuring that new technologies are used safely and that safe use policies are in place.

Addingham Primary School – action to address concerns includes having:

  • Clear structures in place to support the child protection function, i.e. Designated Safeguarding Lead, Named Governor, Whole School Policy.
  • Procedures to follow where there is a concern.
  • Procedures to follow where an allegation is made against a member of staff.
  • Clear anti-bullying policies and procedures.
  • An understanding that disabled children are particularly vulnerable to abuse.
  • An understanding and commitment to working together with other agencies including sharing information appropriately.

 

Managing disclosure

As staff we have a vital role in both the prevention and detection of abuse. We may well be the first to observe that a child has started to behave atypically. We may be the ones the abused child turns to for help. It is essential that we are all aware of the procedures adopted by the school and who should be informed when disclosures are made.

 

It can take a great deal of courage for a child to talk to an adult about their abuse because the child is ‘telling’ on someone more powerful than they are. The child may have to betray a person who is not only close to them but also loved by them and they are risking a great deal in the hope that you will believe what they say.

 

Helpful responses:
·   Remain calm, approachable and receptive and do not pre-judge.
  • Listen carefully, without interrupting.
  • Take the situation seriously.
  • Acknowledge the courage and good sense being shown.
  • Reassure him/her that he/she is right to tell you and that he/she should not feel guilty.
  • Make it clear that you are sorry that this has happened.
  • Let them know that you are going to do everything you can to help.
  • Explain what may happen as a result of the disclosure.
What to avoid if a disclosure is made to you:
·   do not allow your shock or distaste to show;
  • do not probe for more information than is offered;
  • do not question the child or attempt to counsel the child;
  • do not speculate or make assumptions;
  • do not make negative comments about the alleged abuser;
  • do not make promises that cannot be kept, e.g. by saying “everything will be all right”;
  • do not agree to keep the information a secret. Make sure that the child knows that the information will be passed on to the Designated Safeguarding Lead.

 

What to do next:

  • You must make an immediate, careful record of what has been said, using the child’s actual words wherever possible (not your interpretation of them). If you record opinions then ensure that these cannot be confused with facts. This must be uploaded onto CPOMS.
  • Immediately contact the Designated Safeguarding Lead or the Cover for the DSL. They will make a decision based on your report, judging whether or not the issue should be referred to outside agencies. In the absence of the DSL and Cover for the DSL the AHTs must be informed. ·         Remain caring and supportive to the child.
  • Remain alert to any concerns and do not be afraid to repeat or revisit sharing your concern with the DSL.
  • Be responsible for action required.

 Note: 

  • In exceptional circumstances, where you fear for the immediate safety of a child, contact the police or social services department stating that you are making a child protection referral. When you have done this, follow the normal procedures as laid down in the school’s child protection policy.
  • If you have any doubts about making a report consider the possible consequences of not reporting for both the child and yourself. Not to report may be construed as neglect of care and therefore itself may constitute abuse.

 

If you become worried about a child’s behaviour or injuries, but the child says nothing to suggest
that he/she is being abused:
·   be available and be prepared to listen;
  • discuss your concerns with the DSL;
  • do not rely on someone else to take action.

 

Your role is to:
·   be vigilant and responsible;
  • report accurately and carefully to the DSL;
  • support the child by being caring.

 

Gaining Consent  

Designated Safeguarding Leads are requested to consider in each individual case whether it is possible to ask the consent of the parent before making a referral to social services. In many child protection cases the Designated Lead may decide that it is not appropriate to ask the parents’ consent before making a referral. Listed below is a set of circumstances where it has been agreed by the local Area Safeguarding Board (LASB) that a professional may dispense with parental consent.  ·   If seeking consent places the child at risk of “Significant Harm”.

  • When the referring agency has made a professional judgement that a child is at risk of

“Significant Harm” and seeking consent or the refusal of consent is likely to increase the risks to the child, or potentially compromise a child protection investigation.

  • To prevent or aid detection of a crime.
  • When an authorised worker from a child protection agency wishes to check the “Child Protection Register” where there are child protection concerns.
  • Where professional judgement indicates the need to share information to build up a picture, to indicate that a child is at risk of “Significant Harm”.

 

Where a DSL makes a referral without gaining consent of the parent the reason for not doing so
should be recorded on the Child Protection Referral Form.

 

If a DSL decides not to ask the consent of the parent for one of the above reasons, the DSL must consider whether it is safe and appropriate to tell the parent that a referral will be made. It is the general view across all LASB agencies that professionals should tell the parent. However, an exception to this rule is where a child has disclosed child sexual abuse. In this case, the Designated Lead should seek advice from the child protection unit before speaking to parents.

Questioning behaviours

The signs of child abuse might not always be obvious and a child might not tell anyone what is happening to them. You should therefore question behaviours if something seems unusual and try to speak to the child, alone, if appropriate, to seek further information.

If a child reports, following a conversation you have initiated or otherwise, that they are being abused and neglected, you should listen to them, take their allegation seriously, and reassure them that you will take action to keep them safe. You will need to decide the most appropriate action to take, depending on the circumstances of the case, the seriousness of the child’s allegation and the local multi-agency safeguarding arrangements in place. You might refer directly to children’s social care and/or the police, or discuss your concerns with others and ask for help. At all times, you should explain to the child the action that you are taking. It is important to maintain confidentiality, but you should not promise that you won’t tell anyone, as you may need to do so in order to protect the child.

 

Concerns about a child’s welfare can vary greatly in terms of their nature and seriousness, how they
have been identified and over what duration they have arisen. If you have concerns about a child,
you should ask for help.

You should discuss your concerns with your manager, a named or designated professional or a designated member of staff. For example:

  •    for school’s staff (both teaching and non-teaching), concerns should be reported via the school’s designated safeguarding lead. The safeguarding lead will usually decide whether to make a referral to children’s social care;
Named practitioners should promote good practice within their organisation, provide advice and
expertise for fellow practitioners, and ensure safeguarding training is in place.

 

You can also seek advice at any time from the NSPCC helpline – help@nspcc.org.uk or 0808 800 5000. Next steps might involve undertaking an early help assessment or making a referral directly to children’s social care/the police.

If you have concerns about the safety or welfare of a child and feel they are not being
acted upon by your manager or named/designated safeguarding lead, it is your  
Responsibility to take action.  

 

It is important that all staff understand the difference between a ‘concern’ and ‘immediate danger or at risk of harm’ and act accordingly. If in doubt, any stakeholder should seek advice immediately from the designated safeguarding lead

[1] e.g., through birth certificate, passport, new style driving licence, etc

Protecting children from radicalisation  

Buttercup Primary School promotes tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions; we teach a broad and balanced curriculum which promotes the spiritual, moral and cultural development of students and prepares them for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life.  The school promotes community cohesion and safeguards against biased or unbalanced teaching and the promotion of partisan political views and ensures that when political or controversial issues are brought to students’ attention, they are offered a balanced presentation of opposing views

We value the fundamental rights of freedom of speech, expression of beliefs and ideology and tolerance of others which are the core values of our democratic society. However, all rights come with responsibilities and free speech or beliefs designed to manipulate the vulnerable or which advocate harm or hatred towards others will not be tolerated. Buttercup Primary School seeks to protect its students and staff from all messages and forms of violent extremism and ideologies including those linked to, but not restricted, to the following: Far Right/Neo Nazi, White Supremacist ideology, extremist ideology, Irish Nationalist and Loyalist paramilitary groups and extremist Animal Rights groups. Buttercup Primary School is clear that exploitation and radicalisation will be viewed as a safeguarding concern and will be referred to the appropriate safeguarding agencies

 

E-SAFETY

 

Buttercup Primary School has an E-Learning Policy which recognises that E

-safety is a safeguarding issue not an ICT issue and includes safety at home as well as in school.The purpose of internet use in school is to help raise educational standards, promote pupil achievement, and support the professional work of staff as well as enhance the school’s management information and business administration.

The internet is an essential element

in 21st century life for education, business and social interaction and Alma

we has a duty to provide children and young people with quality access as part of their learning experience. It is the duty of Buttercup Primary School to ensure that every child and young person in its care is safe and this applies equally to the ‘virtual’ or digital world.

 

We will ensure that appropriate filtering methods are in place to ensure that pupils are

safe from all types of inappropriate and unacceptable materials, including any extremist material. Please also see online safety policy.

 

TAKING ACTION TO ENSURE THAT CHILDREN ARE SAFE

AT SCHOOL AND AT HOME

 

All staff will follow the Tower Hamlets’ LSCB Child Protection Procedures which are consistent with ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children’ and ‘what to do if you are worried a child is being abused’

It is not the responsibility of the school staff to investigate welfare concerns or determine the truth of any disclosure or allegation. All staff, however, have a duty to recognise concerns and maintain an open mind. Accordingly all concerns regarding the welfare of pupils will be recorded and discussed with the designated senior person with responsibility for child protection (or another senior member of staff in the absence of the designated person) prior to any discussion with parents.

 

  1. In-school procedures for protecting children

All staff and volunteers will:

 Read and be familiar with Part One of Keeping Children Safe in Education (DfE 2016), this policy and other relevant, linked policies.

  • Be familiar with the school’s Child Protection Policy including issues of confidentiality.
  • Remember that the child’s welfare and interests must be the paramount consideration at all times.
  • Never promise to keep a secret or confidentiality, where a child discloses abuse.
  • Be alert to signs and indicators of possible abuse (see Appendix 1 for current definitions of abuse and examples of harm).
  • Record concerns Staff have blank copies of the, “Cause for Concern” forms, which, can be used to write notes if a child makes an immediate disclosure, once completed, must be handed to the designated safeguarding lead (Rena Begum) or her deputy (Afia Rahman) who will scan in the handwritten notes
  • Deal with a disclosure of abuse from a child in line with the recommendations in Appendix 2. These must be passed to one of the designated staff immediately Staff should not take it upon themselves to investigate concerns or make judgements.
  • Be involved in on-going monitoring and recording to support the implementation of interagency child protection and child support plans.
  • Be subject to Safer Recruitment processes (staff) and Disclosure and Barring Service checks (all adults working in school).
  • Will be expected to behave in accordance with the ‘Guidance for safer working practice for those working with children and young people in education settings’ October 2015

 

  1. Staff must immediately report:
  • any suspicion that a child is injured, marked, or bruised in a way which is not readily attributable to the normal knocks or scrapes received in play
  • any explanation given which appears inconsistent or suspicious
  • any behaviours which give rise to suspicions that a child may have suffered harm (e.g. worrying drawings or play)
  • any concerns that a child may be suffering from inadequate care, ill treatment, or emotional maltreatment
  • any concerns that a child is presenting signs or symptoms of abuse or neglect
  • any significant changes in a child’s presentation, including non-attendance
  • any hint or disclosure of abuse from any person
  • any concerns regarding person(s) who may pose a risk to children (e.g. living in a household with children present)

 

Responding to Disclosure

Disclosures or information may be received from pupils, parents or other members of the public. School recognises that those who disclose such information may do so with difficulty, having chosen carefully to whom they will speak. Accordingly all staff will handle disclosures with sensitivity

Such information cannot remain confidential and staff will immediately communicate what they have been told to the designated person and make a contemporaneous record.

Principles

 Staff will not investigate but will, wherever possible, elicit enough information to pass on to the designated person in order that s/he can make an informed decision of what to do next.

         

Staff will:

  •  listen to and take seriously any disclosure or information that a child may be at risk of harm
  • try to ensure that the person disclosing does not have to speak to another member of school staff
  • clarify the information
  • try to keep questions to a minimum and of an ‘open’ nature e.g. ‘Can you tell me what happened ?’ rather than ‘Did x hit you?’
  • try not to show signs of shock, horror or surprise
  • not express feelings or judgements regarding any person alleged to have harmed the child
  • explain sensitively to the person that they have a responsibility to refer the information to the senior designated person
  • reassure and support the person as far as possible
  • explain that only those who ‘need to know’ will be told
  • explain what will happen next and that the person       will be involved as appropriate

 

Action by the Designated Senior Person (or other senior person in their absence)

 

Following any information raising concern, the senior designated person will consider:

 

  • any urgent medical needs of the child
  • making an enquiry to find out if the child is subject to a Child Protection Plan by ringing
  •  discussing the matter with other agencies involved with the family
  • consulting with appropriate persons e.g. Safeguarding Officer, Social Care
  • the child‘s wishes

 

Then decide:

 

  • wherever possible, to talk to parents, unless to do so may place a child at risk of significant harm, impede any police investigation and/or place the member of staff or others at risk
  •  whether to make a child protection referral to social care because a child is suffering or is likely to suffer significant harm and if this needs to be undertaken immediately

 

OR

 

  • not to make a referral at this stage
  •  if further monitoring is necessary
  • if it would be appropriate to undertake an assessment (e.g. CAF) and/or make a referral for other services

 

All information and actions taken, including the reasons for any decisions made, will be fully documented. All referrals to social care will be accompanied by a standard referral form.

 

  1. Action following a child protection referral

The designated senior person or other appropriate member of staff will:

 

  • make regular contact with the Social worker involved to stay informed
  •  wherever possible, contribute to the Strategy Discussion
  • provide a report for, attend and contribute to any subsequent Child Protection Conference
  • if the child or children are placed on the Child Protection Register, contribute to the Child Protection Plan and attend Core Group Meetings and Review Child Protection Conferences
  • where possible, share all reports with parents prior to meetings
  • where in disagreement with a decision made e.g. not to apply Child Protection Procedures or not to convene a Child Protection Conference, discuss this with the Safeguarding Officer for Learning or the Manager of the Child Protection and Review Unit
  • where a child on the child protection register moves from the school or goes missing, immediately inform the key worker in Social Care

                                                        

  1. Recording and monitoring

 

Accurate records will be made as soon as practicable and will clearly distinguish between observation, fact, opinion and hypothesis. All records will be signed and dated, any information given will be recorded verbatim where possible and a note made of the location and description of any injuries seen.

 

All C.P documents will be retained in a ‘Child Protection’ file, separate from the child’s main file. This will be locked away and only accessible to the headteacher and senior designated person. These records will be copied and transferred to any school or setting the child moves to, clearly marked ‘Child Protection, Confidential, for attention of Designated Person Child Protection.’ If the child goes missing from education or is removed from roll to be educated at home then any Child Protection file should be copied and the copy sent to the l Education Social Work Service. Original copies will be retained until the child’s 25th birthday.

 

  1. Supporting the Child and Partnership with Parents

 

  • School recognises that the child’s welfare is paramount, however good child protection practice and outcome relies on a positive, open and honest working partnership with parents
  • Whilst we may, on occasion, need to make referrals without consultation with parents, we will make every effort to maintain a positive working relationship with them whilst fulfilling our duties to protect any child
  • We will provide a secure, caring, supportive and protective relationship for the child
  • Children will be given a proper explanation (appropriate to age & understanding) of what action is being taken on their behalf and why
  • We will endeavour always to preserve the privacy, dignity and right to confidentiality of the child and parents. The Designated Senior Person will determine which members of staff “need to know” personal information and what they “need to know” for the purpose of supporting and protecting the child

Allegations regarding person(s) working in or on behalf of school (Whistleblowing) (including volunteers)

Where an allegation is made against any person working in or on behalf of the school that he or she has:

  1. Behaved in a way that has harmed a child or may have harmed a child
  2. Possibly committed a criminal offence against or related to a child or
  3. Has behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates s/he is unsuitable to work with children.

We will apply the same principles as in the rest of this document and we will always follow the Tower Hamlets Safeguarding Children Board procedures that can be accessed om www.lscbtoerhamlet.gov.uk and find the section entitled “Child Protection in Specific Circumstances” under which you will find  “Allegations Made Against a Person who Works with Children”. Detailed records will be made to include decisions, actions taken, and reasons for these. All records will be retained .

Whilst we acknowledge such allegations, (as all others), may be false, malicious or misplaced, we also acknowledge they may be founded. It is, therefore, essential that all allegations are investigated properly and in line with agreed procedures.

Initial Action

  • The person who has received an allegation or witnessed an event will immediately inform the headteacher/CP Coordinator and make a record
  • In the event that an allegation is made against the headteacher the matter will be reported to the Proprietor Ns Neyarun Nessa who will proceed as the ‘headteacher’
  • The headteacher will take steps, where necessary, to secure the immediate safety of children and any urgent medical needs
  • The member of staff will not be approached at this stage unless it is necessary to address the immediate safety of children
  • The headteacher may need to clarify any information regarding the allegation, however no person will be interviewed at this stage
  • The headteacher will consult with the Local Authority Designated Officer (Phil Holmes – see Contacts List) in order to determine if it is appropriate for the allegation to be dealt with by school or if there needs to be a referral to social care and/or the police for investigation
  •  Consideration will be given throughout to the support and information needs of pupils, parents and staff
  • The headteacher will inform the Chair of Governors of any allegation.

Appendix 1CONTACTS

INTEGRATED PATHWAY AND SUPPORT TEAM: SUE MOORHOUSE 0207 364 5618.

CHILD PROTECTION LINE                               0207 364 3444

 

CME Coordinator

(Children Missing Education)                       Brendan Muchaly 0207 364 3439

 

Education Social Work:

 Team Managers

Senior ESWs:

                                                                                     

Human Resources         Joanne Burnand

 

 SOCIAL CARE

 

Duty and Assessment Team (Duty Social Workers):

0207 364 5000                     

 Emergency Duty Team     (Out of Hours)                                              0207 364 5000

 

METROPOLITAN POLICE                        

 

Child Protection Units                                             0208 534 1212

 

                                                                          

Appendix 2

 

Referral Form to Social Services – Personal Details (Page 1)

 

 

Surname:

 

 

First Name:

 

Title:

 

Preferred Name/Mode of Address:

 

D.O.B.:

 

M/F/Unborn

 

Permanent Address

 

Temporary Address

 

 

 

 

 

Tel:

 

Tel:

 

School attended:

 

Name of School Contact:

 

First Language:

 

Interpreter Required?

 

Ethnic Origin:

 

Religion:

 

If Refugee/Asylum Seeker:

 

NatiNationality:                                                                   Status:

 

Any Risk to Professionals?

 

Does the Child have any Special Needs?

 

G.P. (Inc. Telephone Number)

   

 

FAMILY/OTHER MEMBERS OF THE HOUSEHOLD                                                                                            

 

Name

 

Address/Telephone

 

Age/DOB

 

Relationship

 

Parental Responsibility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

         
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER PROFESSIONALS INVOLVED

 

Name

 

Address & Telephone Number

 

Role

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                              


Referral Form to Social Services – Personal Details (Page 2)

 

 

Surname:

 

First Name(s):

 

 

Subject aware of Referral

 

Responsible Adult aware

 

Referred By:

 

Designation:

 

Date & Time:

 

Address:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Telephone Number:

 

 

Reason for Referral:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current Issues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Continue on separate sheet if necessary)

 

 

 

                                                        

Appendix 3

References

 

Proprietor name Neyarun Nessa 02074881679

Websites

Tower Hamlets Safeguarding Children Board   www.towerhamletslscb co.uk

(Safeguarding Procedures and Training)

 

Children Missing from Education             Brendan Mulchacy 0207 364 3462

 

LADO James Gilley                                 0207 364 3506

Keeping Children Safe                             www.ceop.gov.uk

KS2/3                                                             www.missdorothy.com

Bullying & child abuse                               www.anti-bullyingalliance.org

www.kidscape.org.uk

www.childline.org.uk

www.nspcc.org.uk

Domestic Violence                                      www.thehideout.co.uk

Internet Safety                                              www.ceop.org.uk/thinkuknow

www.childnet-int.org

KS2/3                                                             www.kidsmart.org.uk

Jenny’s story                                                www.childnet-int.org/jenny

 

Safe Practice in Physical Education in Schools           – Chapter 9 – ISBN 978-1-905540-54-9

 

Documents

 

Dfe Documents                                     www.teachernet.gov.uk/childprotection

 

Safeguarding Children and Safer Recruitment in Education (DfES 2006)

Keeping children safe in Education             (DfE April 2015)

 

What to do if you’re worried a child is

Being Abused                                            www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/safeguarding

 

School Documents

Guidance for Safe Working Practice for the Protection of Children and Staff in Education Setting

 

Guidance for Staff facing an Allegation of Abuse

 

Definitions and Thresholds for Managing Allegations against School Staff

 

Managing the Aftermath of Unfounded and Unsubstantiated Allegations

 

NEOST Guidance                                             www.lg-employers.gov.uk

 

Training Materials

Online Basic Awareness Training                   www.towerhamlets safeguardingchildren.co.uk Whole School Safeguarding Training:          Ryan hunter   0207 364 7947

Safe Recruitment Training                               www.ncsl.org.uk for the online course

 

Appendix Strictly Confidential5 Cause for Concern Form           Cause for Concern Form

Note: Please do not interpret what is seen or heard; simply record the facts. After completing the form, pass it immediately to the Designated Safeguarding Lead or Cover for the DLS. 

Name of child…………………………………..    Class …………

 

Name of staff member completing form………………………………………

 

Day…………….. Date……………. Time…………..     Place………… …

(of observed behaviour / discussion / disclosure)

 

Nature of incident / concern including relevant background        (Record child’s word verbatim and any wishes and feelings expressed) 

                         

             Signed:   _____________________________

Action/passed to        ___________________

Recruitment and Selection Checklist

 

Role Advertised:  
Date Advertised:  
Name of Manager completing checklist:  

 

PRE-INTERVIEW:   Initials Date
PLANNING

Timetable decided; job specification and description and other documents to be provided to candidate reviewed and updated as necessary.  Application form seeks all relevant information and includes relevant statements about references etc.   Establish the members of the recruitment panel and ensure they are involved in all stages of the recruitment process, including scrutinising application forms, shortlisting candidates, conducting the interviews and resolving any discrepancies and anomalies.

VACANCY ADVERTISED

Advertisement includes reference to safeguarding policy, i.e. statement of commitment to safeguarding and promoting welfare of children and vulnerable adults, and need for successful applicant to be DBS checked

APPLICATIONS on receipt

Scrutinised – any discrepancies/ anomalies/ gaps in employment noted to explore if candidate considered for shortlisting

SHORTLIST PREPARED
REFERENCES – seeking

Sought directly from referee on short listed candidates: ask recommended specific questions: include statement about suitability of candidate for the post and of working with children and vulnerable adults

REFERENCES – on receipt

Checked against information on application; scrutinised; any discrepancy/ issues of concern noted to take up with applicant (at interview if possible)/ referee

INVITATION TO INTERVIEW

Includes all relevant information and instructions

INTERVIEW ARRANGEMENTS

At least 2 interviewers: panel members have authority to appoint: have met and agreed issues and questions/ assessment criteria/ standards

Name of person on recruitment panel who holds Safer Recruitment certificate

Name Hilary Cave and……………………………………………………………………………………

 

INTERVIEW& POST-INTERVIEW:  Initials Date
SUITABILITY FOR THE POST

Interview explores applicant’s qualifications, knowledge and skills, aptitude and ability, as well as suitability to work with children and vulnerable adults

IDENTITY

· Identity and qualifications of successful applicant verified on day of interview by scrutiny of appropriate original documents: copies of documents taken and placed on file; where appropriate, applicant completed application for DBS Disclosure, disapplication by association check list for EYFS staff

 

PREVIOUS EMPLOYMENT AND EXPERIENCE

Interview explores applicant’s previous employment and experience in order to verify claims on application form

CONDITIONAL OFFER OF APPOINTMENT: PRE APPOINTMENT CHECKS

Offer of appointment is made conditional on satisfactory completion of the following pre-appointment checks and for non-teaching posts a probationary period

REFERENCES (if not obtained and scrutinised previously).
IDENTITY (if that could not be verified on the day of the interview)
QUALIFICATIONS (if not verified on the day of interview)
Permissions to work in UK, if appropriate
Criminal check – satisfactory DBS certificate received
DBS Barred list check – (for regulated activity)
Prohibition Register – (for teachers)
HEALTH – the candidate is physically and mentally fit, as required by the post
QTS – (if required)
INDUCTION – Child Protection training completed – basic awareness of H&S, e-safety, staff code of conduct – safer working practices, Keeping safe in education Ch1, Prevent training, Mobile phone use and camera use, AUP, social media policy, child protection and safeguarding policy, Esafety policy, positive behaviour policy, curriculum policies  etc.